Frank Gilmore | Community Idea Stations

Connect:

Frank Gilmore

Real name: 

Articles by Frank Gilmore

Improving Memory Is Goal for U of R Student

“Love and Marriage...go together like a horse and carriage,” Frank Sinatra reminded his fans in the 1955 hit song.

But many things don’t seem to be connected in any way, yet we sometimes need to find a link. One example is having to think quickly of a connection between a person and his or her name so it can be recalled later. It’s called associative memory, the ability to learn and recall connections between unrelated items.

Hollar's Encyclopedic Eye Exhibition at the VMFA Explores the Intersection of Art and Science

If you are looking to explore both art and science this weekend, you should definitely check out the new exhibition at the VMFA.  "Hollar's Encyclopedic Eye: Prints from the Frank Raysor Collection" features over 200 etchings inspired by mid 17th century European landscapes, insects, historic events and people and were created by one of the most prolific printmakers of the Baroque period, 

Health of Honeybees Tied to Genetic Trait

John Davis is pleased as he inspects one of his hives for signs of a parasite that can wreak havoc on honeybees. “I can’t find a single mite today to save my neck, and that’s a good thing,” said the retired paper-manufacturing supervisor. He started beekeeping at age 15 when his biology teacher, who was a beekeeper, talked about bee research.  Davis and his wife live in Powhatan County, where he has 40 hives.

Too Much Copper Is Fatal To Germs

For thousands of years, people noticed that copper helped ward off certain illnesses, but no one knew why. It seemed that copper had magical powers. In the 19th century, scientists put forth the germ theory, which held that tiny organisms invisible to the human eye were responsible for many diseases. As germ theory gained acceptance, it was recognized that copper had the power to kill germs.

Autism Is Much More Than A Clinical Issue

Parents of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often are frustrated, confused and scared. Healthcare professionals who treat ASD patients are also challenged. Peter Mazure is both. He is the father of a 28-year-old who suffers from ASD and also is a retired clinical psychologist.

“I understand why parents are the way they are. This isn’t just a clinical issue. It’s a personal issue,” he said.

Robot Aids in Kidney Transplant

Jerry Samford was a 20-year-old William & Mary student when one of his kidneys began to fail due to a restricted artery. Most people with only one kidney lead a normal life but Samford was one of the unlucky few. His other kidney was failing more than 30 years later for unrelated reasons. He was referred to Dr. Domenic Sica, a kidney specialist at the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Medical Center for treatment and eventually to the VCU Hume-Lee Transplant Center to prepare for a kidney transplant.

Pages