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Virginia Home Grown

Tips From Richard: Deadhead Your Annuals

Wed, 08/06/2014 - 12:32pm -- WCVE

Deadhead your annuals in early August. Most annuals are able to put on another display before the end of the summer. Pull or clip off all the dead blooms and feed the plants with a water soluble fertilizer. You’ll get another flush of new growth and more great color.

Be sure to read Richard’s weekly Garden Q & A in the Saturday Home Section of the Richmond Times-Dispatch.

Tips From Richard: Test Your Lawn Soil

Tue, 07/29/2014 - 10:15am -- WCVE

Test the soil in your lawn. The results will help you prepare for your fall fertilization as well as let you know if you need to add lime. A soil test can be handled by some garden centers, private labs or through your local Virginia Cooperative Extension office.

Be sure to read Richard’s weekly Garden Q & A in the Saturday Home Section of the Richmond Times-Dispatch.

Tips From Richard: Semi-hardwood Cuttings for Propagation

Thu, 07/17/2014 - 10:21am -- WCVE

Take cuttings from your azaleas and other woody ornamentals for propagation. By early July, the new growth has reached the semi-hardwood stage which is ideal for propagating cuttings. Clip four to six inches of new growth and dip the cut end in rooting hormone. Place the cutting in a small pot with a moist, well drained medium and cover with a clear plastic bag. Place the pot in the shade. Cuttings should root in four to six weeks.

Tips From Richard: Pinch Your Mums

Mon, 07/14/2014 - 9:52am -- WCVE

Pinch your mums one last time in early July. By pinching or clipping off the last inch or two of each stem you’ll force the plants to put out new growth further down on the stem. This will make plants thicker and they’ll still have time to set buds for great color this fall.

Be sure to read Richard’s weekly Garden Q & A in the Saturday Home Section of the Richmond Times-Dispatch.

Tips From Richard: Fertilize Outdoor Container Plants

Thu, 06/12/2014 - 11:11am -- WCVE

Whether you’re growing annuals, perennials or vegetables in your containers, they should be fertilized about once a month with a general purpose water soluble fertilizer. For less frequent applications, try one of the slow release pelletized fertilizers specifically designed for container plants.

Be sure to read Richard’s weekly Garden Q & A in the Saturday Home Section of the Richmond Times-Dispatch.

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