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Virginia Home Grown

Tips From Richard: Prune Spring Blooming Plants

Thu, 04/03/2014 - 3:07pm -- WCVE

Prune forsythia and other spring blooming plants as soon as they finish blooming. This is the perfect time to help develop the plants size and structure for the coming season. Next year’s bloom buds will be set on the new growth that’s produced this year.

Be sure to read Richard’s weekly Garden Q & A in the Saturday Home Section of the Richmond Times-Dispatch.

Tips From Richard: Early Season Bulbs

Tue, 03/25/2014 - 4:22pm -- WCVE

Allow the foliage of your early season bulbs to die back on its own. After the blooms are finished, the plants leaves are storing vital nutrients for next year’s blooms. Removing the leaves while they are still green could prevent next year’s crop of blooms.

Be sure to read Richard’s weekly Garden Q & A in the Saturday Home Section of the Richmond Times-Dispatch.

Tips From Richard: Liriope Grass

Tue, 03/18/2014 - 11:26am -- WCVE
Cut back liriope, or Monkey Grass. Getting rid of the old leaves will make way for the new growth that will emerge in a few weeks. Removing the old growth not only improves the appearance of the plant but eliminates the added stress of trying to support the old growth as well as the new growth.
 
Be sure to read Richard’s weekly Garden Q & A in the Saturday Home Section of the Richmond Times-Dispatch.

Till Cover Crops

Wed, 03/12/2014 - 10:51am -- WCVE

Till your garden cover crop into the soil, as soon as you can work the soil. Fall planted cover crops have done their job of preventing erosion and need to be incorporated into the soil at least two weeks before you begin planting your early season crops. These cover crops can dramatically increase the valuable organic matter in your garden soil.

Be sure to read Richard’s weekly Garden Q & A in the Saturday Home Section of the Richmond Times-Dispatch.

Tips From Richard: Prune Roses

Wed, 02/26/2014 - 10:06am -- WCVE

By late February, the new leaf buds are just starting to grow. When these small buds get at least 1/4 inch long that's the signal to begin pruning. Make pruning cuts on a slight angle and just above an outside bud. This will encourage the plant to open up and allow for good light and air movement. Bush roses can be cut back to 2 to 3 feet in height and climbers can be cut to 5 or 6 feet.

Be sure to read Richard’s weekly Garden Q & A in the Saturday Home Section of the Richmond Times-Dispatch.

Tips From Richard: Early Crocus and Daffodils

Tue, 02/04/2014 - 4:03pm -- WCVE

Following a brief warm spell in mid-February it’s not uncommon to see tender shoots of your crocus and daffodil bulbs popping up from under the mulch. Don’t be concerned; the leaves on these bulbs are quite hardy and will not be damaged by the cold temperatures that are still to come.

Be sure to read Richard’s weekly Garden Q & A in the Saturday Home Section of the Richmond Times-Dispatch.

Tips From Richard: Gift Plant to House Plant

Tue, 01/07/2014 - 2:48pm -- WCVE

Prepare your seasonal gift plants to be long lasting house plants. Most gift plants come with a decorative foil wrapped around the container. Now’s the time to either remove the foil or make holes in the base to allow moisture to run through the pot. As you put your decorations away, find a good location to continue growing your new plants.

Be sure to read Richard’s weekly Garden Q & A in the Saturday Home Section of the Richmond Times-Dispatch.

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