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Each Spring, students across the country compete in robotics competitions. The initiatives develop proficiencies in STEM. But...
Recently scientists were doing a study on discarded edible items and ended up with some pretty interesting food for thought. How...
The twenty third annual Virginia Festival of the Book kicks off in Charlottesville, Virginia today (Wednesday, March 22),...

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Question Your World: Why Are Bees An Endangered Species?

For the last few years, we’ve been hearing about the decline of the bees. Now, in the first week of 2017, the rusty patched bumble bee has officially been designated as an endangered species. To dig in a little deeper, let’s see what’s putting the sting on our bees. Why are bees an endangered species?Listen to this Question Your Worldradio report produced by the Science Museum of Virginia to find out.

Question Your World: How Does The Way You Breathe Impact Your Brain?

Science has solved a lot of the mysteries of the universe, but there are still many things that we know very little about, like our brain. The brain is our cerebral powerhouse and we humans have a pretty unique one compared to all the species that live here on Earth. Recently scientists did an experiment to answer a very big question: How does the way you breathe impact your brain? Listen to this Question Your World radio report produced by the Science Museum of Virginia to find out.

Early Match Making Was A Dangerous Business

The match business was booming at the turn of the 20th century when a match factory opened in Chesterfield County. The American Match Manufacturing Company started its Coalboro plant in 1903 near what today is Pocahontas State Park, according to Ken Shiflett, whose hobby is researching Chesterfield County history. The plant, which operated for 7 years, made its own matchsticks from trees grown on the property and received raw materials and shipped matches using a rail spur next to the plant.

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