| Page 13 | Community Idea Stations

Connect:

FM Stream HD1

The spring thaw is upon us, and parched western states will be watching closely as snows melt and rivers rise. Fancy satellites...
There are billions of people that get around every single day using all kinds of modes of transportations. For moving the most...
College students tackled some big issues at Richmond’s first environmental hackathon. Teams developed prototypes to...

Science Matters Video

Visit our YouTube Channel to see all videos.

Explore Science Matters


More Science On-Demand:

More Science Matters

Question Your World: Why are Scientists Digging Up Old Ice?

Scientists can study the Earth’s current ongoings by observing how things are going right now. However, to study the past requires different approaches. Similar to tree rings or sediment layers, ice holds a lot of interesting information. Climate scientists that are attempting to better understand Earth’s climate history often find themselves looking for clues buried deep down. Why are scientists digging up old ice? Listen to this Question Your World radio report produced by the Science Museum of Virginia to find out.

Rapping and Learning About Our Solar System

Joe Beasley is a 5th-grade teacher at Goochland Elementary School who uses his musical talents to write fun, content-centered songs that kids love. Beasley teaches his students original song lyrics and pairs them with physical actions- also known as kinesthetic learning. This helps his students, of all ability levels, to actively - and energectically - engage in classroom learning that sticks with them.

Question Your World: Why Was Monday's Eclipse So Important?

On Monday (8/21) a large portion of the nation got to experience a total solar eclipse! While all those people with eclipse glasses were looking up at the sun, scientists were studying some pretty awesome things too! Why was Monday's eclipse so important? Listen to this Question Your World radio report produced by the Science Museum of Virginia to find out.

Pages