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Science Matters

Science Matters

Question Your World: How Did Zebras Get Their Stripes?

Sometimes a really small thing can make a very large impact. That's what scientists recently concluded when answering one of the age old questions that humanity has wondered since our earliest days on the plains of Africa, how did zebras get their stripes? Listen to this Question Your World radio report produced by the Science Museum of Virginia to learn more.

Question Your World: Can Your Skull Be Replaced?

Cases for mobile phones are one of the most common purchases made when getting a new phone. This makes perfect sense because it is very important to protect the phone. After all, it holds a lot of important information and allows the user to do a myriad of things at a moment's notice. Well, similarly our brain is very important and nature's well designed case for it, the skull, plays a very important protective role. The only thing that is unlike the mobile phone case, your brain can't be replaced...or can it?

Newsflash: Rowing Isn't About the Arms

Science Matters takes you inside the Physics of Crew. Since making an appearance in the first modern Olympic games in 1896, the sport of rowing has been notorious for its difficulty, competitiveness, and high level of precision. Also known as Crew, this sport has high school, college, adult, as well as national level teams that compete in races called regattas all over the world. Boats race side by side for a short 2000 meter distance or a longer 5000 meter distance as a time trial at speeds reaching 15 miles per hour.

Question Your World: What Came First the Chicken or the Egg?

It’s nearly impossible to go anywhere in the continental United States and not have access to chicken as a meal option. Chicken meat and eggs have been a standard here for what seems like forever, but it had to start somewhere. So, who brought chickens to the Americas? Listen to this Question Your World radio report produced by the Science Museum of Virginia to learn more.

March Citizen Science Opportunity: FrogWatch USA

Looking for another great way to become a Citizen Scientist? How about joining FrogWatch USA™ to monitor frogs and toads and collect data on local species? As a flagship citizen science program, FrogWatch USA™ gives volunteers across the country opportunities to gather information that will give scientists data in the battle to stop amphibian decline.

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