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“ROBO Warriors” Get Ready for Regional Robotics Contest

Members of the “ROBO Warriors” FIRST robotics team at Henrico High School are gearing up for a regional qualifying contest December 15th that will challenge their teamwork and technical skills. The team participates in FIRST Tech Challenge (FTC), a program designed to give students hands-on experience designing and building robots, solving problems and com

Inside Nature’s Giants: Giant Squid

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 9:19am -- WCVE

Thought by many to be the stuff of legend, it was only in the late-19th century that the giant squid was first officially recorded by scientists, after one leviathan washed up on a New Zealand beach. Related to slugs and snails, this monster from the deep, along with its cousin the colossal squid, is the largest invertebrate in the world.  It's never been filmed in its natural habitat, thousands of feet underwater, but occasionally specimens are brought to the surface by deep-sea trawlers.

Your Brain On Music

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 2:27pm -- WCVE

Music is a form of communication which, like language, is inherent to human behavior and brain function. The Richmond Academy of Medicine recently learned about Your Brain on Music in an evening presentation held at the Country Club of Virginia with a Penn State Professor and a rag time piano player–a classically-trained piano player with his own exceptional “brain on music” story to tell.

Epigenetics or “Outside Genetics” at Science Pub RVA

Have you ever wondered how your brain cells came into being? Why didn’t those cells develop into muscle cells instead? How we develop and age is a complex process. DNA is not the whole story and nature versus nurture isn’t so clear cut. While every cell in our body contains the same genetic information, it’s epigenetics (or “outside genetics”) that distinguishes our muscle cells from brain cells.  

NOVA: Ultimate Mars Challenge

Tue, 11/13/2012 - 10:56am -- WCVE

In August, a rover named Curiosity touched down inside Mars’ Gale Crater, carrying 10 new instruments that will advance the quest for signs that Mars might once have been suitable for life. But Curiosity’s mission is risky. After parachuting through the Martian atmosphere at twice the speed of sound, Curiosity was gently lowered to the planet’s surface by a “sky crane.” This first-of-its-kind system has been tested on Earth, but there was no guarantee it would work on Mars.

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