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Science Matters

Young Innovators Are Our Future and Every Child Has What it Takes!

Albert Einstein once said, “To raise new questions, new possibilities, to regard old problems from a new angle, requires creative imagination and marks real advance in science.” This is still true for us today as it is increasingly more important for our children to learn to be creative thinkers and problem solvers. For us to compete globally, we need to teach our kids to be flexible thinkers who can develop solutions, not just memorize facts for the next test.

Question Your World: Does the Brain Clean Itself?

The human brain continues to be one of the most mysterious and impressive topics in the science field. In addition to creating nearly all of our day to day experiences the brain continues to impress scientists as they discover new things about the brain. A recent study asked another question: Does the brain clean itself? Learn more in this week's Question Your World Radio Report by the Science Museum of Virginia.

Test Driving.... Robots!

Eight year old Neha Bandaru made the trip with her mom from Northern Virginia to Richmond…to test drive robots. “It’s amazing what all these robots can do,” smiled the third-grade student. “I don’t think it makes a difference how old you are or whether you’re a girl or a boy,” said Neha. “When I grow up, I want to make a robot that’s huge and use a lot of technology, and then show it to kids.”

Question Your World: Can We Replace our Noses?

The human nose does some pretty amazing things. It can play vital roles in how we communicate with facial expressions; it hangs out with groovy mustaches, and of course helps us detect smells. So what happens when something goes wrong with it? Can we replace our noses? Learn more in this week’s Question Your World Radio Report from the Science Museum of Virginia.

Gravity - Heavy Stuff - and the Science Behind the Movie

Gravity starring Sandra Bullock and George Clooney has been smashing box office records and people have been getting so excited about reading all the inaccuracies in this movie. However, this is a very welcome surprise for the science community because they’re pumped it’s part of the national discourse for once! Check out the video below that explores the science behind the movie.

Student Delegates Urge Lawmakers in D.C. to Find a Cure for T1 Diabetes

Two Richmond girls joined more than 150 children ages 4 to 17 on a critical mission to Washington D.C. this summer. Representing the JDRF Central Virginia Chapter, Bridgette Schutt, 6, and Kamryn Anderson, 12, traveled to our nation’s capital as delegates to the biennial JDRF Children’s Congress to personally urge their lawmakers to help find a cure for type 1 diabetes (T1D).

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