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Question Your World: Can We Replace our Noses?

The human nose does some pretty amazing things. It can play vital roles in how we communicate with facial expressions; it hangs out with groovy mustaches, and of course helps us detect smells. So what happens when something goes wrong with it? Can we replace our noses? Learn more in this week’s Question Your World Radio Report from the Science Museum of Virginia.

Gravity - Heavy Stuff - and the Science Behind the Movie

Gravity starring Sandra Bullock and George Clooney has been smashing box office records and people have been getting so excited about reading all the inaccuracies in this movie. However, this is a very welcome surprise for the science community because they’re pumped it’s part of the national discourse for once! Check out the video below that explores the science behind the movie.

Student Delegates Urge Lawmakers in D.C. to Find a Cure for T1 Diabetes

Two Richmond girls joined more than 150 children ages 4 to 17 on a critical mission to Washington D.C. this summer. Representing the JDRF Central Virginia Chapter, Bridgette Schutt, 6, and Kamryn Anderson, 12, traveled to our nation’s capital as delegates to the biennial JDRF Children’s Congress to personally urge their lawmakers to help find a cure for type 1 diabetes (T1D).

Question Your World: What Does Water on Mars Mean for the Future?

After years of looking at extremely distant landscapes via photos and taking many guesses as to why Mars has the landscape it does, we finally have a little bit of the answer. Turns out that the Curiosity rover has scooped up some soil and identified water! So, what does water on Mars mean for the future? Learn more in this week’s Question Your World Radio Report from the Science Museum of Virginia.

Science Pub RVA: Bigger Thinking on Biodiversity

When you think “biodiversity,” what do you picture? Was it the Amazon rainforest, a U.S. National Park like Yellowstone, or the Great Barrier Reef? These are definitely areas chock-full of interesting and dynamic plants and animals. But biodiversity and its importance aren't reserved to these hotspots. New discoveries and a growing understanding of biodiversity are changing our thinking and could lead to shifts in conservation approaches.

Flora and Fauna of Virginia Environmental Education Conference

Do you know how to make household cleaners? How about solar energy? As an educator, how do you get families involved in learning about the environment? And, as a student, how do you find out about opportunities in the fields related to environmental education? These questions and more will be addressed in an upcoming conference arranged by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation.

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