Join us on         

Science Matters

Science Wednesday: Meet the Coywolf

Tue, 01/21/2014 - 10:33am -- WCVE

The coywolf, a mixture of western coyote and eastern wolf, is a remarkable new hybrid carnivore that is taking over territories once roamed by wolves and slipping unnoticed into our cities. Its appearance is very recent — within the last 90 years — in evolutionary terms, a blip in time. Beginning in Canada but by no means ending there, the story of how it came to be is an extraordinary tale of how quickly adaptation and evolution can occur, especially when humans interfere.

Want to Know What’s Percolating in Nearby Woods?

Immerse yourself in wetland science while enjoying food and friends at Science Pub RVA on Tuesday, January 28th. (Please note date change due to weather.) Join one of RVA’s creative scientists, Anne Wright a VCU stream ecologist, and find out what’s happening with our amphibian neighbors. This evening of discovery will increase your knowledge and appreciation of our often overlooked vernal pools.

Governor McAuliffe Announces Virginia's Outstanding Scientists and Governor's Award for Science Innovation

Governor Terry McAuliffe and Science Museum of Virginia Chief Wonder Officer Richard C. Conti are pleased to announce Virginia’s Outstanding Scientists of 2014 and the recipient of the Governor’s Award for Science Innovation presented by Altria.

Nuts and Bolts: How Our Brains Think About STEM

Wed, 01/15/2014 - 1:25pm -- WCVE

From With Good Reason - What if you could change not just how much you know, but your actual intelligence? Psychologist Oliver Hill (Virginia State University) believes that special cognitive training can rewire the way brains work and help kids succeed in math and science. And: Stereotypes affect the way others see us and the way we see ourselves.

Question Your World: Is There A Glue That Can Help Fix Our Wounds?

Busted door knobs, broken heels, and cracked glasses are a few things that can be fixed using super glue. The quick bonding adhesive works on nearly everything, perhaps that's why this glue is considered to be super. As amazing as this glue is it still can't be used to help us seal up surgical cuts and incisions due to its toxicity. So, is there a way to make glue that won’t be dangerous for us?

Science Wednesday: The Private Life of Deer

Tue, 01/14/2014 - 3:28pm -- WCVE

From coast to coast, some 30 million white-tailed deer make their home in the United States. Deer are the most highly studied mammals in the world, but does the typical homeowner with deer in the yard know how long deer can live? When they sleep? How many babies a doe can have each year?

Enter the hidden world of white-tailed deer outfitted with night-vision cameras and GPS tracking equipment to see them not as common backyard creatures, but as intelligent, affectionate family members.

Question Your World: Can We Control Aging?

Every event in the universe that we have been able to observe is deeply entangled with time. Time's forward impact has an influence on everything from the forming of distant galaxies to the wear and tear within our cells. The impact time has on us is called aging. This is a constant and forward moving process, but does it have to be? Can we control aging? Learn more in this Question Your World radio report produced by the Science Museum of Virginia.  

Science Wednesday: Alien Planets Revealed

Fri, 01/03/2014 - 11:26am -- WCVE

NASA’s planet-hunting Kepler Telescope has discovered thousands of exotic new worlds far beyond our solar system. Are any of them like Earth? And what sort of life could flourish on them?

With vivid animation and input from expert astrophysicists and astrobiologists, NOVA takes you on a mind-bending exploration of these strange worlds and the possible creatures we might one day encounter there.

American Experience: Poisoner's Handbook

Thu, 01/02/2014 - 10:31am -- WCVE

In the early 20th century, the average American medicine cabinet was a would-be poisoner’s treasure chest: radioactive radium in health tonics, thallium in depilatory creams, morphine in teething medicine and potassium cyanide in cleaning supplies. While the tools of the murderer’s trade multiplied as the pace of industrial innovation increased, the scientific knowledge (and political will) to detect and prevent the crimes lagged behind. Unnatural deaths were handled by the coroner, a position handed out to the corrupt and unqualified as political payback.

Pages

Subscribe to Science Matters