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American Experience: Poisoner's Handbook

Thu, 01/02/2014 - 10:31am -- WCVE

In the early 20th century, the average American medicine cabinet was a would-be poisoner’s treasure chest: radioactive radium in health tonics, thallium in depilatory creams, morphine in teething medicine and potassium cyanide in cleaning supplies. While the tools of the murderer’s trade multiplied as the pace of industrial innovation increased, the scientific knowledge (and political will) to detect and prevent the crimes lagged behind. Unnatural deaths were handled by the coroner, a position handed out to the corrupt and unqualified as political payback.

Question Your World: What Happened in Science this Year?

Right around the holiday season we start to see a lot of top 10 lists that go over all the major highlights of the year. Entertainment, politics, sports, and day-to-day living are all discussed in the yearly recap. So, what happened in science this year? Listen to this Question Your World radio report produced by the Science Museum of Virginia to find out.

Holiday DIY Projects: Exploring Ice Crystals

Here is another great winter craft that incorporates several STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) based principles. Create an ice crystal. This activity is ideal for children between the ages of 16 months and 4 years old. Begin the activity by providing children several basic facts about snow. Facts can be very simple for a young child, 16 - 24 months, and increase in detail according to the age and interest level of the child.

Question Your World: What's Up With Moons?

From our closest celestial neighbor to distant objects that orbit planets, moons are pretty interesting. The more we learn about them the more interesting they become. Scientists are constantly looking at various moons as future projects, but why? What's up with moons? Find out in this Question Your World radio report produced by the Science Museum of Virginia.

Holiday DIY Projects for the Younger Set: Evergreen Wreath

The holiday season is the perfect opportunity to explore the great outdoors and use nature to create holiday decorations. Using items found in the outdoor environment is the ideal way to support your child's academic learning and incorporate STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) principles. Materials found in nature support a child's exploration and understanding of various scientific concepts such as the life cycle of a plant. An evergreen wreath is the perfect activity for children to complete at home.

Wintry Citizen Scientist Projects - Get Involved!

Baby, it’s cold outside! To mark the first day of winter on December 21st, we’d like to share this list of wintry Citizen Science projects by SciStarterSciStarter is a fantastic website where you can discover, get involved in, and contribute to science research projects through recreational activities. They have over 600 citizen science projects listed!

Question Your World: How Does the Brain Make Decisions?

Decisions, decisions, decisions! Our lives are basically a series of decisions, on after the other. The big and small decisions we make shape and guide everything in our lives. So, the big question right now is, how does the brain make decisions? Learn more in this Question Your World radio report produced by the Science Museum of Virginia.

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