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Emmett Chappelle: Breathing in Space and Life on Mars

Welcome to week three of our ongoing series showcasing black scientists and inventors. This week we will be highlighting Emmett Chappelle who worked with NASA to develop the first breathing apparatuses for space and a method to detect life on Mars. Chappelle has been honored as one of the 100 most distinguished African American scientists of the 20th Century.

Question Your World: What are Gravitational Waves?

The science world occasionally gets rocked by a large breakthrough or discovery. Recently there’s been a lot of buzz about gravitational waves, so let’s catch that wave and chat about this epic discovery. Let’s dig into the big question: What are gravitational waves? Listen to this Question Your World radio report produced by the Science Museum of Virginia to learn more.

The Human Face of Big Data

Tue, 02/16/2016 - 10:07am -- WCVE

The gathering and analyzing of massive amounts of data allow us to address some major challenges, but the accessibility of so much data comes at a steep price. This film captures the promise and peril of the extraordinary knowledge revolution.

Watch The Human Face of Big Data February 24 at 10:00 p.m. on WCVE PBS/WHTJ PBS. Check listings for additional air-times.

Question Your World: Can Dogs Talk To Each Other?

We’ve all been told that communication is the secret to a good relationship, right? That truth is not just for humans. Animals must maintain close relationships in order for the species to survive as well. While there are millions of species that we still need to learn more about we have become very good at at least getting to know other mammals. Dogs are some of our most well known mammalian friends, but what do we know about how they communicate?

Memory Hackers

Mon, 02/08/2016 - 9:25am -- WCVE

Memory. Whether it’s sharp, fuzzy, poignant or thrilling, it’s the glue that binds our mental lives. Without it we’d be prisoners of the present, unable to use the lessons of the past to change our future.

From our first kiss to where we put our keys, memory represents who we are and how we learn and navigate the world. But how does it work?

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