Join us on         

Science Matters

Question Your World: How Many Photos Have Ever Been Taken?

Birthday parties, graduations, engagements, and most other milestones in our life get captured by photograph. The camera has revolutionized how we as a species document things, ranging from scientific purpose to simple a selfie with a friend at lunch. These days most people have access to a camera and the amount of photos we take is getting larger daily. So, how many photos have ever been taken? Listen to this Question Your World radio report produced by the Science Museum of Virginia to find out.

Vaccines — Calling the Shots

Tue, 08/25/2015 - 10:14am -- WCVE

Diseases that were largely eradicated in the United States a generation ago—whooping cough, measles, mumps—are returning, in part because nervous parents are skipping their children's shots. NOVA’s “Vaccines—Calling the Shots” takes viewers around the world to track epidemics, explore the science behind vaccinations, hear from parents wrestling with vaccine-related questions, and shed light on the risks of opting out.

Question Your World: How Fast Can Cities Grow?

One of the defining traits of humanity is our social nature. Living and working together has been a large factor in our survival. For thousands of years we’ve been living together in cities. As technology increases so does the size and scope of our cities. How fast can cities grow? Listen to this Question Your World radio report produced by the Science Museum of Virginia to learn more.

Good Thinking! New Educational Resources from PBS LearningMedia and the Smithsonian Science Education Center

PBS LearningMedia and the Smithsonian Science Education Center today (8/18/15) announced a partnership to bring new digital resources to teachers and students. Beginning today, the professional development series Good Thinking! will now be available on PBS LearningMedia, the media-on-demand service for educators that serves over 1.6 million users across the country.

Notes from a Lazy Stargazer

I woke up at 3:00 a.m.. Why? Fate, I guess. I live near the UR campus under the canopy of a primeval forest. Meteor watching from my backyard doesn’t work very well. The UR campus, however, does offer some decent openings onto the night sky. I parked by the practice fields and looked out. Fortunately, I drive a convertible and was able to recline in the comfort of the car and gaze out. Campus lighting pretty well eliminated a quarter of the sky closest to the horizon on the campus side of the car. The rest of the sky was dark enough.

Pages

Subscribe to Science Matters