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Science Matters

Question Your World: What do Looms and Laptops have in Common?

If you’re reading this you must be using some sort of computer. Most of us have an idea about the origins of our modern computer units, but sometimes explaining the lineage of these machines leads only up to the first design. The big question is - how did we get all the way to a computing machine? We could not have gone from fire or the wheel straight to iTunes, right? What’s responsible for the giant leaps and bounds in technology that make our life what it is today?

DNA: A ‘New’ Crime-solving Molecule?

Anyone who has ever watched “Law and Order” or “CSI” knows: obtaining and analyzing DNA evidence features prominently in many of its fictional criminal cases. But leaving such TV dramatizations aside, over the last two decades, DNA evidence has come to play an increasingly routine and important role in the U.S. law enforcement and justice systems. Technological innovations within science and social policy have both played a role in this process. 

Question Your World: Why Can’t We Stop Thinking?

Try to stop thinking for five seconds. Ready?…steady…GO! Okay, now you’re just reading this and not-stopping-your-thinking! So why can’t we stop thinking? Well, this is the handiwork of our old friend, evolution. A long time ago moment-to-moment readiness was necessary for survival. In those days people had to worry about things like lion attacks, leopard attacks, monkeys stealing berries, scorpions, falling rocks, drowning, giant snakes, and so on. This required a brain that was constantly working.

Virginia State University Extension Exploring Aquaponics

Virginia State University is ready to begin construction on a unique Aquaponics research lab in a downtown Petersburg warehouse. Aquaponics is the combination of aquaculture, or fish-farming, and hydroponics, growing plants without dirt in nutrient rich water. It’s an ancient concept but a comparatively new scientific field and Virginia State University is on the cutting edge.

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