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Bumble Flower Scarab

From Dr. Art Evans' Blog – The bumble flower scarab, Euphoria inda (Linnaeus), is the most widely distributed species of Euphoria in North America, ranging from Quebec south to Florida, west to British Columbia, Oregon, Colorado, and southeastern Arizona. The head and pronotum are mostly black, while the elytra are yellowish-brown with variable black spots. The dorsal surface is shiny or dull.

The larvae develop in various accumulations of plant materials, rotten wood, and within the thatched nests of ants in the genus Formica. Adults emerge from their earthen pupal cases in late summer, overwinter, and become active again the following spring. They are often found flying close to the ground in the morning until midday, especially over piles of grass, edges of haystacks, compost piles, manure, and other plant debris. They are sometimes found in numbers drinking sap from wounds on tree trunks and exposed roots, or feeding on various flowers and ripe fruits.