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Articles by WCVE

Science Wednesdays: “Elsa’s Legacy: The Born Free Story”

Mon, 07/15/2013 - 12:58pm -- WCVE

More than a half-century has passed since the publication of Born Free — a book and then a film that changed forever the way we think about wildlife. What has happened to lions since this story? And what has happened to the people featured in the film? What has Born Free taught us?

Watch Nature: “Elsa’s Legacy: The Born Free Story” July 17 at 8:00 p.m. on WCVE PBS/WHTJ PBS.

Science Wednesdays: Ultimate Tut

Mon, 07/08/2013 - 10:04am -- WCVE

Ninety years ago in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings, the greatest archaeological find in history was made: the discovery of Tutankhamen’s tomb and its golden treasures. It made Tutankhamen the most famous name in ancient Egyptian history. But the real story has become shrouded in myth — with many mysteries around the tomb unsolved to this day.

Watch Secrets of the Dead: Ultimate Tut July 10 at 9:00 p.m. on WCVE PBS / WHTJ PBS.

Science Wednesdays: Invasion of the Giant Pythons

Tue, 06/18/2013 - 10:15am -- WCVE

Florida’s Everglades National Park is one of the last great wildlife refuges in the United States, home to numerous unique and endangered mammals, trees, plants, birds and turtles, as well as half a million alligators. However, the Everglades is also the dumping ground for many animal invaders — more than 15 species of parrot, 75 kinds of fish and 30 different reptiles from places as far away as Africa, Asia and the Caribbean.

Science Wednesdays: Ape Genius

Tue, 06/11/2013 - 3:12pm -- WCVE

The great apes —  which include chimps, orangutans, gorillas and bonobos —  seem to have rich emotional lives similar to our own. But just how smart are these animals? A new generation of investigators is revealing the secret mental lives of great apes; our evolutionary next-of-kin are turning out to be far smarter than most experts ever imagined.

Science Wednesdays: Decoding Neanderthals

Mon, 05/13/2013 - 11:16am -- WCVE

What happened when the first modern humans encountered Neanderthals 60,000 years ago? In 2010, a team led by geneticist Svante Paabo announced that they had reconstructed much of the Neanderthal genome and the analysis showed that modern humans and Neanderthals had interbred, leaving a small signature of Neanderthal genes in everyone outside Africa today.

Science Wednesdays: The Private Life of Deer

Mon, 05/06/2013 - 9:21am -- WCVE

From coast to coast, some 30 million white-tailed deer make their home in the United States. Deer are the most highly studied mammals in the world, but does the typical homeowner with deer in the yard know how long deer can live? When they sleep? How many babies a doe can have each year?

Enter the hidden world of white-tailed deer outfitted with night-vision cameras and GPS tracking equipment to see them not as common backyard creatures, but as intelligent, affectionate family members.

Science Wednesdays: Australia’s First 4 Billion Years

Fri, 04/05/2013 - 2:43pm -- WCVE

Of all the continents on Earth, none preserves a more spectacular story of its origins than Australia. NOVA’s miniseries takes viewers on a rollicking adventure from the birth of the Earth to the emergence of the world we know today. With high-energy host and geologist Richard Smith, meet titanic dinosaurs and giant kangaroos, sea monsters and prehistoric crustaceans, disappearing mountains and deadly asteroids.

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