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Prabir Mehta

Articles by Prabir Mehta

Question Your World: Can We Control Other People’s Brains?

Magic show hypnotists and neurologists have at least one thing in common. Both spend a lot of time trying to learn more about how to control the brain. For hypnotists, this difficult task involves medallions and soft spoken commands, but neurologists require some pretty mind blowing technology. A recent study demonstrated how cutting edge technology has been used to begin to answer that age old question; can we control other people’s brains?

Question Your World: What is the Oldest Living Thing on Land?

Humans live to be about 80 years old. In that time we develop, change, and interact with the world around us. Similarly all living things do their own version of that process. For some species that all takes place in a short lifespan, while others take an enormous amount of time. A remarkable species in California puts longevity into great perspective. What is the oldest living thing on land? Listen to this Question Your World radio report produced by the Science Museum of Virginia to learn more.

Question Your World: When Will We Know More About Pluto?

In 1930 Clyde Tombaugh discovered Pluto from the Lowell observatory. Since then it has been many things to many people, but for the first time ever it’s about to be subject of an up-close study by the New Horizons team. What will we learn from Pluto? When will we know more about Pluto? Listen to this Question Your World radio report produced by the Science Museum of Virginia to find out.

Question Your World: How Can We Truly Approach Climate Change?

Every year scientists discover newer and newer things about our Earth. There are constantly new stories on discovering unknown creatures, plant life, meteorological happenings, and beyond. While we’re learning new things about our home we are also keeping an eye on things we’ve known of for a while, like the global change in climate.

Question Your World: Why Did We Add An Extra Second This Year?

College students, high level business execs, parents, and just about anyone that does anything are always wishing they had more time. Lucky for us, our wishes have been granted in 2015. This year will officially be one second longer. Why did we add an extra second this year? Listen to this Question Your World radio report produced by the Science Museum of Virginia to find out.

Question Your World: What Moves the World's Biggest Mountain?

The roof of our planet is located in Nepal. Mt. Everest is the world’s largest mountain clocking in at nearly 29,000 feet (5.5 miles high). Clearly moving something as massive as this giant hunk of rock would require something much greater than any human invention ever created. Recently Mt. Everest has moved an inch to the southwest. What moves the world’s biggest mountain? Listen to this Question Your World radio report produced by the Science Museum of Virginia to learn more.

Question Your World: What Do We Really Know About Pluto?

As culture and technology progress, we learn more and more about the natural world that surrounds us. From the obvious to the abstract, science has brought us a deeper understanding of everything from the daily sunlight that hits the Earth to the most distant places in the known universe. Our solar system is one of the biggest mysteries to humanity and we strive to know more and more about our own back yard. We’ve studied closer objects more, but what about those distant places? What do we really know about Pluto?

Question Your World: Who Was The First Maker?

Our built world is a pretty remarkable byproduct of humanity. From door wedges to the International Space Station, we’ve become pretty good at making stuff. More recently the maker culture has exploded into many niche categories around the world, everything from custom made knives to walls that display vital health stats. Where did all this begin? What was the first thing that got the world of making going? Perhaps more importantly, who was the first maker?

Question Your World: Can It Really Rain Spiders?

For nearly 400 million years our planet has been home to spiders. In their time on Earth they have become vital parts of ecosystems, some of nature’s coolest architects, and they’ve even fallen down as rain from time to time. Can it really rain spiders? Listen to this Question Your World radio report produced by the Science Museum of Virginia to find out.

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