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John Ogle

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John Ogle began his career in broadcast journalism while still in high school. In nearly 50 years on the radio he has worked as a news anchor for the ABC, NBC, and Mutual networks and as News Director of radio stations in Richmond, Miami, Washington, and New York City. After ten years as News Director of WCXR, Alexandria, John returned to Richmond in 1993 and organized The Richmond Times Dispatch Broadcast News Service. In its 12 year history, the network’s programming was heard on 20 radio stations across Virginia. John retired from the Times Dispatch at the end of 2004 but is still heard daily as a freelance Correspondent on WCVE Public Radio and on the ABC Radio Network.

Articles by John Ogle

Federal Judge Rejects Injunction Request for Transmission Line

A federal judge has turned down an injunction that would have blocked construction of Dominion Energy’s Surry-Skiffes Creek transmission line project across the James River. There is opposition to its being so near Historic Jamestowne and other landmarks.

Dominion’s Bonita Harris says the project has been thoroughly studied.

"We are pleased the court found that the plaintiffs failed to establish a likelihood of irreparable harm prior to this case being decided on its merits."

Grant Helps Improve Access to Fresh Food for Low Income People

The Richmond health district has received a one year $100,000 grant to fund the Grown to Go Mobile Market and its efforts to improve access to fresh foods for people using SNAP, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program that used to be known as food stamps.

The Grown to Go Mobile Market is the work of Richmond based Shalom Farms. Director Dominic Barrett said they have a simple goal. “We work with communities to insure access to fresh and the support to live healthy lives.”

Petersburg Non-Profit Working to Keep Youth Farm Open

A retired Marine, Mike Jackson, organized Think, Then Choose Wisely. The goal is to provide young people in Petersburg with role models, training, and programs they need to succeed in life. Among those programs is a farm, right in the middle of the city. 

The community farm occupies just over five acres next to J.E.B. Stuart Elementary School. Kids are taught about agriculture and healthy and sustainable lifestyles. They work the farm and sell what the grow. But, at present, there’s a problem.

Virginia War Memorial Exhibit – The Art of War

At Virginia War Memorial there’s a very moving exhibit entitled The Art of War. It features military art in a variety of forms. Some of it the work of veterans.

One sculpture, The Veterans Impact Project is quite unique. Kevin Orlosky, artistic director of Art on Wheels in Richmond, explained how they created it. “We set up a 3,000 pound wall of clay and built a Roman siege weapon called a Ballista - a giant cross bow.”

Lakeside Elementary Students Helped to Build a Learning Lab

Students at Henrico’s Lakeside Elementary School know that good nutrition is important and they’ve been busy turning unused courtyard space into an outdoor learning lab and adding growing towers in several classrooms.

The students had help from volunteers from the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, VCU, Publix and the Dominion Energy Foundation that provided funding.

UVa School of Medicine Pushing to Increase Physician Scientists

The number of physician-scientists is increasing at the University of Virginia School of Medicine. Dean David Wilkes says immunology studies, in particular, are accelerating.

Dr. Daniel Lee genetically modifies a patient’s immune or T- cells and infuses them to attack an individual’s cancer and develop an immune response. “At the present time, (CAR) T- cell therapy has been most widely studied in the setting of leukemia. However, this is an application that could be used to treat any number of cancers in both pediatric and adult malignancies alike.”

Prince George Dedicates the Gardens at Exit 25 Gateway

Prince George County officials have dedicated the first of what will be several community gateway projects resulting from a unique partnership with the Cameron Foundation and local governments in the Tri-Cities.

The Gateway is a garden spot along a very busy highway - I-95. They call it The Gardens at Exit 45 and according to Deputy County Administrator Jeff Stoke, it has a very simple purpose.

"To beautify the intersection to help lure visitors and travelers stop there, spend the night, eat and use it as a safe haven on their travels."

SELC Questions Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Decision

On Friday, The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, FERC, approved a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity for the Atlantic Coast natural gas pipeline project. The Southern Environmental Law Center was disappointed.

SELC attorney Greg Buper told WCVE that FERC applies a balancing test when it reviews pipelines, balancing the adverse impacts against the public benefit.

Virginia Outdoors Foundation Okays Pipeline Easement Conversions

The Virginia Outdoors Foundation’s Board has approved the conversion of 11 protective easements on land that is in the routes proposed for the Mountain Valley and Atlantic Coast natural gas pipelines.

Board Chair Stephanie Ridder noted that the foundation spent three years working on a deal to reduce the effect on the easements.

"Were it my choice, I would stand in front of the pipeline and stop it but that’s not gonna work and I do think its gonna have harmful effects on the environment, particularly the water and it breaks my heart that it’s happening."

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