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Debbie Mickle

Articles by Debbie Mickle

The Diversity Problem in Science

Why is it we know so little about the lived experiences of scientists of color and their responses to the claims made about them in the name of science? Dr. Evelyn Hammonds, a historian of science at Harvard University, uses W. E. B. DuBois' 1939 essay, “The Negro Scientist,” to address the question of the persistent under-representation of native-born U.S. African –Americans, Native Americans and Latino Americans in the U.S. scientific and technical workforce from the early 20th century to the present.

NOVA’s Live Coverage of Cassini’s Death Dive to Saturn

Almost everything we know today about the beautiful giant ringed planet comes from Cassini, the NASA mission that launched in 1997 and arrived at Saturn in 2004. Since then, the spacecraft has been beaming home miraculous images and scientific data, revealing countless wonders about the planet, its rings, and 62 moons—including some that could harbor life.

Rapping and Learning About Our Solar System

Joe Beasley is a 5th-grade teacher at Goochland Elementary School who uses his musical talents to write fun, content-centered songs that kids love. Beasley teaches his students original song lyrics and pairs them with physical actions- also known as kinesthetic learning. This helps his students, of all ability levels, to actively - and energectically - engage in classroom learning that sticks with them.

Total Solar Eclipse: Experience and Learning Resources

The total solar eclipse on Monday, August 21 will be the first total solar eclipse in 99 years. This extraordinary cosmic spectacle will pass through 13 states, and everyone in the continental U.S. will have the opportunity to see at least a partial eclipse, making it the most widely viewed American eclipse of all time. Commencing at 10:15 a.m. PDT (1:15 p.m. EDT), a lunar shadow 73 miles wide will take one hour and 33 minutes to travel from Oregon on the west coast to South Carolina on the east, allowing continuous observation for 90 minutes.

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