Join us on         

Craig Carper

Craig Carper's picture

WCVE Public Radio political contributor.

Articles by Craig Carper

Elected Leaders Promote “An Hour of Code”

Richmond Mayor Dwight Jones, Virginia Secretary of Education Anne Holton and other elected leaders appeared at the Science Museum of Virginia yesterday (10/9) to encourage local students to participate in an “Hour of Code.”

There are currently more high tech jobs in the U.S. than there are qualified applicants. The national code movement encourages students to explore computer science at a young age through games and tutorials to put them on a path toward the high tech careers of tomorrow.

Bill Would Clarify Tenants Rights

A bill from Democratic Delegate Alfonso Lopez of Arlington would clarify that landlords cannot evict tenants as retaliation for filing a complaint. Under current law tenants have a very hard time disputing eviction notices on month-to-month leases. In some cases renters are evicted shortly after making complaints. Retaliatory eviction is unlawful but hard to prove.

State Workforce Development Programs Fall Short

A new study from the state’s legislative oversight commission, JLARC, shows that Virginia’s high schools and community colleges and other workforce training programs are failing to prepare students for in-demand skills. JLARC Analyst Tracey Smith says companies complain that the program is overly complex and difficult to use and improperly emphasizes low-demand skills.

Community College Spokesman Jeff Kraus says Virginia needs to invest in greater capacity for high-demand workforce credentials.

Board of Health Will Review Controversial Abortion Regulations

The State Board of Health has voted 13-2 to begin a two-year review process of controversial regulations to abortion clinics including building standards equal to those for new hospitals.

Victoria Cobb, President of the Family Foundation of Virginia pushed for the regulations to be adopted in 2012. She says the review process will not diminish that victory.

Kathy Greenier of the ACLU of Virginia says the regulations have nothing to do with patient health and safety. She says Thursday the board voted for medicine over politics.

McAuliffe Appoints Former Senator to Board Ahead of Abortion Vote

Yesterday, Governor Terry McAuliffe appointed former Democratic state Senator Mary Margaret Whipple to the Board of Health, less than 24 hours before its meeting this morning (12/4), where it will vote on whether to review controversial abortion clinic regulations. The rules impose the same building standards for abortion clinics as those for new hospitals.

Abortion rights advocates say the standards are an effort to force clinics to close, as two have already done. Anti-abortion activists say they are necessary to protect women’s health.

Warner Hopeful New Congress Will Act

Speaking to reporters via Skype for Associated Press Day at the Richmond Times-Dispatch, Senator Mark Warner said he’s glad the election is over and remains optimistic that things can get done in the new Congress. Warner believes the election results, including his narrow victory over his Republican opponent Ed Gillespie, put pressure on congress to show that they can govern.

Warner believes the Congress can make progress on infrastructure improvements, government data transparency, lowering student debt, improving Obamacare and simplifying the tax code.

Webb Outlines His Priorities As He Weighs Presidential Bid

Former Senator Jim Webb, who is contemplating a bid for the Democratic nomination for President, outlined his priorities for the country at the Associated Press Day at the Richmond Times-Dispatch.

Webb spoke of spreading economic fairness, noting that the stock market has nearly tripled since the economic crash of 2008 but real wages and loans to small businesses have slightly dropped.

The former senator says the mass incarceration of those convicted of non-violent offenses is a national crisis in the criminal justice system.

Crime Commission Defers Action on Teen Sexting

The Virginia Crime Commission has deferred action on teen sexting until next year, saying it needs more time to study the problem.

The Crime Commission had considered lowering criminal sentences for minors who send self produced nude images via text message or other electronic means, exempting them from prosecution under child pornography laws aimed at adult predators.

Camille Cooper, legislative director of the national child advocacy group PROTECT says Virginia’s sentencing data shows that juveniles are not receiving felony sentences for underage sexting.

Crime Commission Recommends Cigarette Retail Licenses and Fees

The Virginia Crime Commission is recommending that retailers who sell cigarettes be licensed to do so, in order to fight the growing problem of cigarette trafficking. The Alcoholic Beverage Control would administer the licenses.

36 other states require similar licenses with costs ranging from $60-$240 dollars. The licenses would only apply to cigarettes, not cigars or other tobacco products.

Pages