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Craig Carper

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Craig Carper is the News Director for 88.9 WCVE Public Radio. Craig studied journalism at Virginia Commonwealth University and has worked in broadcast news since 2001. He’s worked in various capacities covering Virginia politics for WCVE PBS since 2006. For six years starting in 2009 he served as the political reporter for 88.9 WCVE before being promoted to News Director in July of 2015.

Craig served as the host of Capitol Events during the General Assembly Session on WCVE PBS, a daily one-minute update on legislative issues.

In 2012 he conducted an exclusive interview with President Barack Obama. In 2015 he interviewed former President Jimmy Carter.

Craig has contributed over 100 nationally run news stories to NPR and has been featured on the PBS NewsHour with Judy Woodruff and the Rachel Maddow Show on MSNBC.

He’s covered 3 Governors, the 2009 and 2013 gubernatorial campaigns, the 2012 and 2014 U.S. Senate races, the 2012 Presidential campaign and in 2014 he provided daily national coverage of the trial of former Governor Bob McDonnell for NPR.

Articles by Craig Carper

Richmond Circuit Court Denies Limits Legislative Privilege in Redistricting Case

The nonpartisan redistricting advocacy group One Virginia 2021 is challenging 11 state legislative districts held by members of both parties, saying the boundaries are not compact and contiguous as required by the state constitution.

A separate motion from House Republicans to stay the case pending the outcome of a separate challenge to Virginia’s house districts was also denied.

The trial is expected to proceed in late summer or early fall.

Non-Partisan Redistricting Bills Killed in House Subcommittee

Several bills that would have taken some of the politics out of redistricting were rolled together and killed Tuesday (2/2) in a House subcommittee.

House Privileges and Elections Chair, Republican Mark Cole of Spotsylvania says the bills were premature, as the General Assembly is not scheduled to redraw it’s districts again for 5 years.

Brian Cannon, Spokesman for the non-partisan redistricting advocacy group One Virginia 2021 says it’s easier to set the rules fairly now, when the future partisan make up of both chambers is unknown.

Northam Breaks Tie to Defeat Bill to Expand Concealed Carry Rights

Lieutenant Governor Ralph Northam cast a tie-breaking vote in the Senate Monday (2/1) to defeat a bill that would have eliminated the permit requirement for concealed handguns.

Openly carrying a firearm without a permit is legal in Virginia.

The bill patroned by Republican Senator Dick Black of Loudon would have allowed gun owners to conceal carry without a permit.

Democratic Senator Chap Petersen of Fairfax says requiring people to register for concealed carry keeps them accountable.

Jones Wants Tax Increase for Education on the Ballot

During his final State of the City Address Mayor Dwight Jones announced his plans to put the question of raising the real estate tax to fund public schools on the ballot for voter approval.

Mayor Jones says Richmond has long been shortchanged by a state formula that doesn’t take into account it’s high concentrations of poverty and that the city.

Richmond needs to have a serious conversation about the available resources they have to address the unmet needs in public schools.

Gun Deal Reaches Rare Compromise

Governor Terry McAuliffe, State lawmakers and advocates appear to have reached a rare compromise on one of the most divisive issues in politics, the balance of gun rights and gun violence prevention. The deal would reverse Attorney General Mark Herring’s opinion late last year, which ended concealed handgun reciprocity agreements with dozens of other states.

In exchange gun rights proponents have agreed to prohibit those who have a permanent protective order for domestic violence against them from carrying a firearm.

Transgender Restroom Case Goes Before 4th Circuit Court of Appeals

The U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond heard oral arguments today (1/27) in a case brought by the ACLU challenging what they say are discriminatory restroom policies for transgender students by the Gloucester School Board.

The ACLU argues that Gavin Grimm, a 16-year-old transgender student who identifies as male, should not be delegated to an alternate restroom facility for students with “gender identity issues.”

House Republicans Roll Out Education Agenda

House Republicans rolled out their education agenda today (1/26) at the State Capitol, with many of the bills focusing on school choice.

One bill would increase the tax credit for donations to nonprofit scholarship groups from 65-90%.

Another would give students the option to transfer to any school within their school district.

There’s also a proposal to create Education Savings Accounts to give parents the ability to put their kids in private schools.

Several bills would aim to expand access to early childhood education, but not universal Pre-K.

Transgender Restroom Case Goes to Federal Appeals Court Wednesday

The U.S. Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond will hear oral arguments Wednesday morning (1/27) in the ACLU case against the Gloucester County School Board for what they say are discriminatory restroom policies for transgender students.

Gavin Grimm, a 16-year-old transgender Junior at Gloucester High School was born female but identifies as male.

General Assembly to Consider Further Changes to Mental Health System

The General Assembly will consider additional reforms to the state’s mental health system this year, changes the legislature hopes will empower families with loved ones struggling with the commitment process.

One bill would require treatment centers to make greater efforts to reach out to families once a loved one is involuntarily committed.

Other legislation would allow families to appeal a clinicians decision not to commit a family member.