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Charles Fishburne

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Charles Fishburne is a correspondent for WCVE Public Radio. He brings over 40 years experience as a broadcast journalist and news executive in Richmond, Washington D.C. and New York. Charles was also a long-time television news anchor and news director in Richmond.

Articles by Charles Fishburne

Henrico County Board of Supervisors Approves New Budget

The Henrico County Board of Supervisors last night (4/25) approved both general fund and capital budgets, providing a steady property tax rate, raises and new programs.

The $839.7 million dollar budget holds real estate taxes at 87¢, provides raises of 2.5% for all county employees, adds 27 firefighters, a new firehouse, 10 new policeman, a new heroine task force, and full funding for schools at $469 million, up 3.6% from last year.

County Manager JohnVithoulkas said, “We have provided everything the schools have requested.”

Forty-five Year Virginia Tech Carilion Study Shows Dramatic Effects of Early Childhood Education

Children who are given high-quality education at an early age are more likely to be employed full-time and have better relationships with their parents as adults according to a Virginia Tech study, now entering its fifth decade.

The study follows 96 children who have continuously participated in the Abecedarian Project, an early education program for at-risk infants and children that started in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 1971. The National Institutes of Health funded the original study.

Governor Says Agritourism Is A $2.2 Billion Dollar Business In Virginia

Governor McAuliffe has announced new figures that show agritourism has become a $2.2 billion dollar business in Virginia, with everything from wine tasting to berry picking and farmer’s markets.

Pole Green Produce is ready, “We usually open this time of year and shoppers are coming back for more tomatoes and strawberries, snaps and stuff like that, cantaloupe.

Virginia Supreme Court Hears Atlantic Pipeline Cases

The Virginia Supreme Court is expected to decide in about 30 days on two cases heard yesterday (4/19), challenging a controversial state law that allows surveyors to enter private property without the owner’s consent.

The law has stirred strong opposition along the routes of two interstate pipeline projects in Virginia, Mountain Valley and Atlantic Coast Pipeline. Friends of Nelson County Spokesman Ernie Reed said, “This is just one piece of a very complex puzzle.”

Virginia Supreme Court Hears Atlantic Pipeline Cases

The Virginia Supreme Court heard two cases yesterday (4/19), challenging a controversial state law that allows surveyors to enter private property without the owner’s consent.

The law has stirred strong opposition along the routes of two interstate pipeline projects in Virginia, Mountain Valley and Atlantic Coast Pipeline, including Friends of Nelson County. Spokesman Ernie Reed said, “This is just one piece of a very complex puzzle.”

Virginia-based Orbital ATK Sending Seventh Spacecraft To International Space Station

Virginia-based Orbital ATK is sending another Cygnus spacecraft to resupply the International Space Station this morning (4/18).

Orbital is a key component in Virginia’s claim to be a portal to space, with a multi-billion dollar NASA contract and it’s seventh supply mission today.

Orbital’s Paul Escalera said, “We’re very excited to support the ISS and its crew by delivering cargo.”

Researcher Develops Models to Help Urban Areas Plan for Increased Pollution of Chesapeake Bay

Virginia Tech researchers say the cost to reduce pollution will increase with climate change, and are working on models to help urban planners develop management practices early enough to make a difference.

Zachary Easton is a lead project investigator for Virginia Tech who says most Americans don’t believe in Climate change and even if they did, don’t know what to do about it

UVA Researchers Discover Ways To Map Living Genes

Researchers at the University of Virginia have found a way to view genes inside living cells and map them out in 3D, a development that can help scientists shed light on cancer and other diseases and potentially find treatments.

“Here for example we are targeting two separate genomic divisions,” said Mazhar Adli. For Adli, the little glowing dots dancing about on the computer screen are a fulfillment of a dream. Before, scientists had to kill living cells to track the genes.

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