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From Vietnam to Virginia: Cultivating a Cultural Inheritance

Soon after the city of Saigon fell to North Vietnamese forces in 1975, thousands of people fled the country seeking to escape the reign of the communist government. Many refugees resettled in the U.S., including here in Virginia. In our series Vietnam: Virginia Remembers, Saraya Wintersmith has more for Virginia Currents on one family’s journey.

Social Isolation Can Be Fatal, But Central Virginia Offers a Remedy in Friendship Cafes

In Greater Richmond, about one in four older adults lives alone. Along with major life changes like losing a spouse or retiring, this can lead to social isolation and even premature death. But there are growing efforts to create engagement opportunities. WCVE’s Catherine Komp has more for Virginia Currents.

As Virginia's Older Population Grows, Advocates See Opportunities to Engage, Reverse Stereotypes

The process of aging is a lifelong journey, but stereotypes about “getting old” can have negative impacts on people’s happiness and health. Some experts say recognizing ageism is the first step, and others are creating intergenerational spaces to explore the positive aspects of aging. In the first of a two-part series, Virginia Currents Producer Catherine Komp has more.

Transcript:

Walk through the birthday card aisle, flip through a magazine, or turn on the TV - and Tracey Gendron says you’ll see ageism.

As Pedestrian Deaths Rise in Virginia, Advocates Push for Vision Zero

Across Virginia, more than 700 pedestrians and bicyclists have been killed and more than 20,000 injured in traffic crashes since 2010. Advocates say these deaths and injuries are preventable and are pushing for full implementation of an initiative called “Vision Zero.” WCVE’s Catherine Komp has more for Virginia Currents.  

Communities Seeks Ways to Unify and Build Resilience in Wake of Charlottesville Violence

In the hours and days following the violence in Charlottesville, people responded to the trauma in different ways. They came together in parks and places of worship; they organized listening sessions and collaborated on self-care tool kits. Some are also seeking ways to do more to counter white supremacy. WCVE’s Catherine Komp has more for Virginia Currents.

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