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Women of the World Unite(d)! (Plus some other great tunes)

For this week's show (3/19), I wanted to make sure that I highlight some of the great singers and musicians I've come to admire in the world of World Music. The list of artists I've picked is by no means complete--and it shouldn't be. But, it's enough to hopefully get you started on a quest to find out more about whom I'll be playing. Plus, maybe you'd like to add your two bits below. Who did I miss? Once you hear my show on Saturday, come back here to let me know--maybe I'll be able to play them at a later date.

Parallels in Vinyl

This week (3/5/11) keyboards and guitar – then and (sort of) now. Thijs van Leer and Jan Akkerman hail from the progressive rock group FOCUS from the 1970’s and for better or worse, they are remembered for Hocus Pocus, something that guitarist Akkerman is not exactly fond of (he has expanded his role over the decades as a specialist in early music as well). Some of their most interesting jams took place on the disc Focus III. The original is out of print but you’ll be set right by way of my snap, crinkle & pop (a.k.a.

Eurocrime and the Experimental Jazz Group “Glows in the Dark”

Richmond guitarist Scott Burton, who leads the experimental jazz group Glows in the Dark, has  composed some soundtrack music for a forthcoming documentary called Eurocrime! The Italian Cop and Gangster Films That Ruled the ’70s. (Think cheaply made Italian versions of Dirty Harry, The French Connection and The Godfather and you’ll get the idea).

About Time for the Blues

Time for the Blues is a retrospective of all blues music and is produced and hosted by John Porter and Henry Cook. The program focuses on specific artists and various themes in the blues, especially featuring major contributors such as: Muddy Waters, B.B. King, Mike Bloomfield, Howlin' Wolf, Charlie Musselwhite and John Lee Hooker, among many others.

World Music Show: What Is It?

What’s the World Music Show? It’s marimbas, castanets, kalimbas and even a digeridoo. It’s sound images that take you everywhere from a cafe in Mexico City to the shores of the Ivory Coast. It’s a mix of everything that makes music the universal language. It’s also music that you may not associate as “World Music,” like a tune from a familiar artist, such as Paul Simon or David Byrne, who are able to infuse their songs with the beats of distant cultures.

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