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Stranger Things

There have been some strange things in the world of World Music. Sure, some happen to think that World Music involves the spiritual, ethereal sounds of wind chimes, chants and handclaps led by people wearing burlap sacks or something of the sort. However relevant or not those styles of World Music are, in my book, I seldom give them any credence. But more importantly, what does this have to do with this week’s World Music Show (3/11)?

In a word: Zilch.

A Gigantic Mess...Or?

The adjective “gigantic” is a fun one to use. It can describe so many things. But is it apropos to be the umbrella which protects the contents of a World Music Show? Sure! Why not! Because on this week’s World Music Show (3/4), they’ll be some gigantic beats to protect, or rather more aptly project.

What to Expect When Expecting

More than 11 years ago, my wife and I read a great book called “What to Expect when Expecting,” which if you don’t know is about having a baby. Well, on this week’s World Music Show (2/25), I could stretch or mutilate that title and pirate it for this week’s show, as in “What to Expect in World Music.” I admit, it is a stretch. And, for those who may be looking for hidden clues in this blog, no, my wife and I are not “expecting.”

Cypress String Quartet Releases Their Final Recording With Music of Brahms

The Cypress String Quartet recently decided to disband after 20 years together. For their final recording project, the ensemble chose the two string sextets by Johannes Brahms. The quartets' members are Cecily Ward and Tom Stone (violins), Ethan Filner (viola) and Jennifer Kloetzel (cello).

Langston Hughes Project at VCU

Langston Hughes published the 800-line poem “Ask Your Mama: 12 Moods for Jazz” in 1961. One of his most ambitious works, the poem touches on so many different things that it’s very hard to describe in a few sentences. In large part, it’s a meditation on the struggle for freedom in the U.S. and elsewhere in the early sixties. It references major figures in the American civil rights movement and the leaders of African nations that were gaining independence at the time.

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